N2 People Skills

Tuesday, October 5, 2010

How ready is your Super Yacht Crew - Performance and input factors.

Is the interpersonal atmosphere aboard your Super Yacht conducive to a good working and living relationship ? If not there may be concern when the function of communication (that is at the heart of management) comes along.

Super Yacht crew's interpersonal atmosphere can be like cholesterol, there is good and bad cholesterol, neither can be seen without investigation, all can seem fine but underneath be quietly, slowly building until you have a clogged artery and you end up in the emergency room. In the case aboard with interpersonal atmosphere, it can all seem fine until it builds to a scenario that results in a situation. One that you or your crew may not be ready to deal with, have the people skills to deal with, or the time to deal with it. Worse case is that it creates a situation that causes over 80%  of accidents and incidents at sea, Human Error!

Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) are great when they are there to be read, learned and referred to. But when emotion is a cause of a clog, anger, annoyance, jealousy, insecurity, to name a few, SOP's can go out the window with good communication right behind them.

 Interplay of Multiple Input Factors:
Individual, group, organizational, regulatory, environment.
Keeping cholesterol at the right levels requires some understanding of how diet and lifestyle are input factors to this. So understanding that individual, group, organizational, regulatory and environmental factors all have roles in overall crew performance is important to good communication, good crew resource management, good performance and risk management:


  •  Individual factors can be the knowledge, skill and training, personality, motivation, and physical and emotional states.
  • Group factors can be the composition, climate, structure and Norms.
  • Organizational factors can be the culture of the Yacht,  evaluations and reinforcement, SOP's, Norms  resources and scheduling.
  • Regulatory factors include organizational and Yacht policies, IMO, ILO and flag state regulations, evaluation standards and training requirements.
  • Environmental factors can be weather, physical condition of the Yacht and equipment, and working conditions (noise, working below decks, quiet time etc).